Real Women Today Real Women Today Real Women Today Real Women Today

Has the fashion design world finally gone mad?

fashion model real women health advice

Do they honestly think that stick thin model, Martyna Budna represents the real women out on the streets?

London Fashion Week has really shown designers in their true colours.  All their blustering and high brow pontification about how there was the need for more realistic models on the catwalk and how they were going to buy into promoting models as healthy individuals appears to have gone down the toilet – along with most of the models lunches judging by just how many ribs were on show!

Chloe Memisevic looked like she’s just come out of some kind of concentration camp with a BMI of easily below 15. A healthy BMI falls somewhere between 18.5 and 24.9. People lower than  18.5 are know to be at risk of brittle bone disease, heart failure, organ degeneration, pneumonia and an early, horrible death.  And all those people genuinely fighting eating disorders are having even more stick thin models flaunted in their faces as though looking this ill is acceptable – which we all  know that it is not.

Certainly the fashion designers and the fashion press must think that we are both blind and stupid.  Don’t they realize that we study our own bodies carefully? So when a beautifully airbrushed photograph appears on the front of one of our favourite magazines, do they not expect us to sit there and laugh about where the particular subject has been ‘touched up’ or where she might have had her latest plastic surgery?  She is after all a woman, and we all know what happens to us ALL over time!

And where do you lot get off calling size 12 a plus size model?  Talk about an easy way to make women paranoid! Apparently it’s the demands of the fashion  industry in New York, Paris and Milan that are to blame for this – hang on a minute – aren’t these the same people who said that they were going to use more realistic models?

To be brutally honest, I’ve always thought that the fashion lot were up themselves and have no concept of what it’s really like in the real world out here.  I’ve never bought something just because it was fashionable regardless of the size that I may have been.

But there are young women and some young men out there for which this unrealistic aspiration is being force fed to them through fashion media on every level and its making them ill.  This is wrong and I really hope that something happens soon to make the fashion world stop and think about the irresponsible and dangerous message that they are giving out to our youngsters.

That’s my Real Women Today rant over with for now, what does everyone else think?

Share

Tags: , , , , , , ,

3 Comments »

  1. [...] her body parts?  Don’t we have enough problems with our teenagers aspiring to be size zero catwalk models? Yes she is glamorous and has a glamorous lifestyle and I have no doubt that she works hard for it [...]

  2. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by alison marie jackson, Real Women Today. Real Women Today said: Have the designers finally lost it? http://realwomentoday.com/2011/02/has-the-fashion-design-world-finally-gone-mad/ [...]

  3. Henrietta says:

    I think it just proves that the fashion industry is a law unto itself and doesn’t feel it has to answer to anyone – but will occasionally pay ‘lip service’ in order to quash too much negative publicity. I honestly believe that a large percentage of [often gay, male] designers would rather, not only design, but SEE their clothes worn by young boys (hence why the female models often look like pre-pubescent boys). And it would appear that their dreams have now come true in the form of 19 year old, male, Serbian model Andrej Pejic – who not only happily wears the female clothes, but looks better in them than most of the female models! Crikey, these designers can’t design clothes for hips, bottoms and busts so let’s leave them with their trans-gender models rather than driving our young females to anorexia for the sake of their misogeny!!

Leave a reply